Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

Just recently I had to respond to a Facebook comment that compared Donald Trump to Barack Obama, this regarding Trump’s lack of familiarity with the truth:

And we should paint President Obama with the same brush? In this regard Obama is a piker compared to Trump. Actually, not even Nixon attained Trump’s rarefied air.

Obama a piker. Yes, a slacker. Then I wondered if anybody reading had an idea where we got the term “piker.” That’s this week’s Quiz Question. What’s the origin of the term?

Post your answer as a comment below. No fair running to  Google. You were supposed to know this stuff already.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

This is from somebody else. It showed up on my Facebook feed just in  time, when I needed inspiration for a new Quiz Question. It’s easy. Give yourself about 15 seconds. The problem was posed as:

There are three boxes and three statements. There is a car in only one of the boxes. Only one statement is true. Which statement is true, and in which box is the car?

Post your answer as a comment below.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

Got this one from the Internet, so no fair going to Google for the answer.

ABCDEF × 3 = BCDEFA

Substitute a digit for each letter to provide the correct equation. Post your answer as a comment below. The solution will be provided next week (or sooner).

Update

No solution given yet. I have not taken the time to solve this, but here are some hints.

Note that A < 4 and A ≠ 0. A ≠ 0 is not stated in the problem, but I’m taking it as assumed. If A > 3, then multiplying by three would produce overflow and a number with more digits.

BCDEFA is divisible by 3, which means ABCDEF is divisible by 3, since both have the same digital root.

BCDEFA is divisible by 9.

That should get people going, so I’m going to give more time to come up with an answer.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

Easy one for a change, so give yourself 10 seconds to work it. It’s a single water hose with the ends uncoupled. Where are the ends?

Post your answer in the comment section below.

Update and solution

The solution is straight-forward. See the revised picture below.

Draw circles (ellipses) around A and B. Each has three hoses crossing into (or out of) the ellipse. Therefore, there must be a hose end within each of the two ellipses. Since there are only two ends (one hose), the ends must be under A and B. You don’t need to examine C and D, but if you do you will observe an even number of crossings.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

Oh no! It’s another geography question. Which is larger (more square miles), Honshu or Cuba? Post your answer as a comment below.

Update

It’s Wednesday already, and I just noticed nobody has gotten the Quiz Question from last week. Here’s the answer.

Both Cuba and Honshu are about 800 miles in  length, but apparently Honshu’s bulk adds enough acreage to easily bump Cuba at 88,009 square miles to Cuba’s 42,426. That’s sort of like two to one.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

jokes-lauren

Monday again. Time for a new Quiz Question of the Week. This is one for the culturally-deprived. What is significant about the following?

I’m a Cranky Old Yank in a Clanky Old Tank on the Streets of Yokohama with my Honolulu Mama Doin’ Those Beat-o, Beat-o Flat-On-My-Seat-o, Hirohito Blues

Hint: it’s in the Guinness Book of World Records. Post your answer in the comments section before you head to Google to get the answer.

Update and answer

Helen suggested this might be the longest title, and if she had said it was the longest song title she would have won first prize, a year’s subscription to Donald Trump’s health care program. Lucky Helen.

The clue is that songwriter Hoagy Carmichael is featured in the movie. He plays the piano and sings his songs in the bar where critical action takes place. What readers might also like to know is that Hoagy Carmichael is also in the Guinness Book of World Records as being the most prolific songwriter.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

mathematics-gemoetrydivideidentical

Readers have been getting off easy recently. I’m going back to geometry questions, so give your brain a work out.

I found this on the Internet, but you shouldn’t go looking for the solution without first coming up with a solution. With a single line, does not need to be straight, divide the shape shown above into two identical parts. Post your answer as a comment below.

Actually, send me a copy of your solution by email, and I will post it.

Update

No solution. I have not solved it. Mike proposed a solution. See his comment below. Unable to post a graphic, he indicated the shape of the solution as follows:

XX
XXX
X

See the figure below:

Shape A is the original, turned upright. Shape B is Mike’s proposed solution in graphical form. My apologies if I misinterpreted Mike’s rendition.

What is apparent to me is that shape B cannot be fitted twice into shape A. I’m calling the Quiz Question still  unanswered.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

mathematicscomputeangle

Mathematics again. What is the value of the indicated angle? Post your answer as a comment below.

Update

Three people have submitted correct answers, all holding Ph.D. degrees, but none in mathematics. Here is my solution, which I believe to be the simplest approach. See the diagram:

mathematicscomputeangle-02

It’s the same as the original diagram, but I have added some labels, and I have added line BC.

Notice immediately that BC is the same as AB. If you don’t notice this immediately, then stop reading now and get into another line of work. Now notice that angle BAD is the same as angle EBC. Again, if you don’t notice, stop reading. BAD = EBC implies ABC is a right angle. Again, you can quit while you’re ahead. We have a right isosceles triangle, which means that BAC is 45°. And no mental gymnastics have been required.