Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

There’s a lot of stuff out there. Some more than others. On this planet, which is more?

  1. Uranium or lead
  2. Gold or platinum
  3. Sulfur or calcium
  4. Hydrogen or potassium
  5. Sodium or potassium
  6. Copper or zinc
  7. Nickel or aluminum
  8. Silver or nickel
  9. Iodine or fluorine
  10. Oxygen or iron

These are hard. You can use Google. Post your answers on Facebook. It’s interesting which things are more than you expected.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

Know your chemistry? At standard temperature and pressure everything is something. Which of the following  are solid?

  • acetone
  • sulfur
  • iodine
  • acetic acid
  • mercury
  • fluorine
  • beryllium
  • citric acid
  • lithium hydride
  • ammonium nitrate
  • silicon carbide
  • carbon tetrachloride
  • nitroglycerin
  • unsymmetrical dimethylhydrazine

Post your answers in the comment section below.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

This week’s Quiz Question is a mixture of nostalgia, history, and language. Answer as many as you can. Post your answers in the comments section below.

  1. SNAFU is an acronym. What does it stand for?
  2. FUBAR is an acronym. What does it stand for?
  3. Where was Killroy?

Update and answers

These date back to the Second World War.

SNAFU (in dinner table language) stands for Situation Normal, All Fowled Up.

FUBAR stands for Fowled Up Beyond All Reason.

Killroy was always “here.” The simple drawing with the slogan, “Killroy was here,” adorned many a fighting vehicle and bunker of American forces.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

This week it’s back to language and literature. Following is a list of words:

  • HOT
  • MOM
  • PAT
  • BOAT
  • COAT
  • TAKE
  • EAT
  • CHAP
  • TAPE
  • PACT
  • EXCEPT
  • EXACT

Besides being simple words and presented here in all caps, what do all these words have in common? Post your answer as a comment below.

Update and hint

Here’s a hint. I’m adding more words that fit the requirement. What is the least common thing all these words have in common?

  • HATCHET
  • MATCH
  • PATCH
  • CATCH
  • HAPPY
  • POTTY
  • MYTH

Update and answer

Nobody even made a stab at this one, but the answer is simple. All the words are spelled with letters that look like capital letters in the Russian alphabet. Keep in mind, they are not necessarily the same letters in both alphabets. A comparison:

  • A = A
  • E = E
  • K = K
  • M = M
  • O = O
  • T = T

None of the others correspond.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

The topic for this week’s Quiz Question is famous quotes.

  1. Somebody first said famously, “There is no “there” there. Who said it first and what is it?
  2. When told that a certain person had died, the response was, “How can they tell?” Who died, and who said it?
  3. “If I owned half that dog I would kill my half.” Who said it?
  4. “It isn’t over until the fat lady sings.” Who said it? What was the inspiration?
  5. “Veni, vidi, vici.” Who said it first? What does it mean?
  6. “She makes you want to burn every bed in the world.” Who said it.
  7. “I have never killed any one, but I have read some obituary notices with great satisfaction.” Who said it? Not Churchill as I first thought.
  8. “Gott Mit Uns.” You know what it means. Where was it famously inscribed?
  9. “If there is a God, He will have to beg my forgiveness.” May not be an actual quote, but what is the supposed origin?
  10. “I’ll let you be in my dreams if I can be in yours.” Who wrote that?

Update and answers

Readers should have know most or all of these.

  1. Gertrude Stein said this about Oakland, California.
  2. Dorothy Parker, when told that Calvin  Coolidge had died, famously asked, “How can they tell?”
  3. Actually what Mark Twain said was, “If I owned half that dog, I would shoot my half.”
  4. The fat lady is the archetypal soprano in a Wagnerian opera. The opera is not over until the fat lady sings. Yogi Berra is alleged to have said it as a way of explaining when the game is over. Actually, he never  attended an opera in  his life, and it is most likely Sam Goldwyn said it first.
  5. Supposedly Julius Caesar said, in Latin, “I came, I saw, I conquered.”
  6. H.L. Mencken said this on admiring a grotesque sample of the opposite sex.
  7. Legendary trial lawyer Clarence Darrow said that.
  8. The Nazi storm troopers who ravaged a conquered Europe, raping, looting, and killing, wore belt buckles with the inscription, in German, “God [is] with us.”
  9. This was supposedly discovered inscribed on a wall in one of the Nazi death camps after liberation.
  10. Nobel Prize-winning  poet Bob Dylan provided this thought in his song Talkin’ World War III. I use it from time to time.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

Mondays are slow days, but there is always a Quiz Question to puzzle, confuse, entertain.

Geography again. Everybody’s favorite subject. No fair running to Google maps. Just close your eyes and remember what it was like when you last drove through these places. Answer any or all. Highest score wins.

Which countries share a border?

  1. France and Luxembourg
  2. Luxembourg and Liechtenstein
  3. Italy and Slovenia
  4. Austria and Romania
  5. Greece and Bulgaria
  6. Czechia and Hungary
  7. Switzerland and Luxembourg
  8. Slovenia and Hungary
  9. Germany and Denmark
  10. Poland and Ukraine

Post your answers in the comments section below, then scurry to Google Maps. Best score wins.

Time’s up.

Nobody had a go at answering last week’s Quiz Question(s). Some were easy, others not so. Here are mine:

  • France and Luxembourg – Duh, yes.
  • Luxembourg and Liechtenstein – No way. Switzerland is in between.
  • Italy and Slovenia – Yes. Not something most people would know 70 years ago. Things have changed.
  • Austria and Romania – No, Hungary is in between.
  • Greece and Bulgaria – Yes. There is a considerable stretch of border.
  • Czechia and Hungary – No, Slovakia is in between.
  • Switzerland and Luxembourg – No.
  • Slovenia and Hungary – Yes, new since the last big war.
  • Germany and Denmark – To be sure.
  • Poland and Ukraine – And yes.

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

Mondays are slow days, but there is always a Quiz Question to puzzle, confuse, entertain.

Geography again. Everybody’s favorite subject. No fair running to Google maps. Just close your eyes and remember what it was like when you last drove through these places. Answer any or all. Highest score wins.

  1. Do Oklahoma and Colorado share a border?
  2. Same question—Oklahoma and Missouri?
  3. Michigan and Wisconsin?
  4. Iowa and Kansas?
  5. Minnesota and Nebraska?
  6. Oklahoma and New Mexico?
  7. Arkansas and Kentucky?
  8. Delaware and Pennsylvania?
  9. New Jersey and Maryland?
  10. Oregon and Utah?

Post your answers in the comment section  below. Then scurry over to Google Maps.

Update and Answer

Helen and Prasad have answered, apparently without resorting to  maps. Here are the correct answers:

  1. Do Oklahoma and Colorado – Yes
  2. Oklahoma and Missouri – Yes
  3. Michigan and Wisconsin – Yes
  4. Iowa and Kansas – No
  5. Minnesota and Nebraska – No
  6. Oklahoma and New Mexico – Yes
  7. Arkansas and Kentucky – No
  8. Delaware and Pennsylvania – Yes
  9. New Jersey and Maryland – No
  10. Oregon and Utah – No

Quiz Question

One of a continuing series

Literature again. It’s time to see who’s been  doing their summer reading.

A number of literary works begin with a significant sentence or phrase. Here are some. Identify the author, and for extra credit, identify the work.

  1. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times
  2. Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice.
  3. In the second century of the Christian æra [This opening is so critical that a man used the words to name his children.]
  4. It was a pleasure to burn.
  5. It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen.
  6. Call me Ishmael.
  7. These are the times that try men’s souls.
  8. Mama died today. Or yesterday maybe, I don’t know.

No fair running to Google. There is a page that lists many famous opening lines. Post your answer as a comment below. Best score wins.

Update and Answers

  1. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times – First sentence in Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
  2. Many years later, as he faced the firing squad, Colonel Aureliano Buendía was to remember that distant afternoon when his father took him to discover ice. – First sentence in One Hundred Years of Solitude by Gabriel García Márquez. Written originally in Spanish.
  3. In the second century of the Christian æra [This opening is so critical that a man used the words to name his children.]- Opening words of The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire  by Edward Gibbon.
  4. It was a pleasure to burn. – First sentence in Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
  5. It was a bright cold day in April, and the clocks were striking thirteen. – First sentence in 1984 by George Orwell (Eric Blair)
  6. Call me Ishmael. – First sentence in Moby-Dick by Herman Melville.
  7. These are the times that try men’s souls. – First sentence in The American  Crisis by Thomas Paine.
  8. Mama died today. Or yesterday maybe, I don’t know. – First sentence in The Stranger by Albert Camus. Originally in French. Tania should have known that one, because she gave me a copy, although in French.