Dying to Believe

Number 118 in a series

Who needs Jesus? Premature death is available from all manner of false belief. For example:

Prosecutor: Missing boy died at New Mexico compound in religious ritual

Y’all be careful out there. Religious zeal knows no limits.
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Your Friend The Handgun

Number 123

The answer to the gun death crisis is not fewer guns but putting God back into our lives. How’s that working out?

1 dead, suspect in custody after shooting at Mormon church in Nevada

Last Updated Jul 22, 2018 11:34 PM EDT

Authorities are investigating a shooting that took place at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Fallon, Nevada. At least one person was killed and one person was injured Sunday afternoon, according to CBS affiliate KTVN-TV. The station writes that the suspect, John K. O’Connor, 48, is in custody but has not been charged yet.

KTVN-TV reports there were about 50 witnesses when the incident unfolded inside the church. Police say the suspect went home after opening fire and police followed him there where a hostage negotiator was able to get him to surrender.

I’m glad we finally got that matter settled.

Dying to Believe

Number 117 in a series

Did I say it’s necessary to believe in Jesus in order for you to die before your time? If I ever said that, then I need to apologize. It is not necessary to believe in Jesus for you to die needlessly. But it helps:

In October 1994, Tony Dutoit’s infant son (Emmanuel Dutoit), aged three months, was killed at the group’s centre in Morin-Heights, Quebec. The baby had been stabbed repeatedly with a wooden stake. It is believed that Di Mambro ordered the murder, because he identified the baby as the Antichrist described in the Bible. He believed that the Antichrist was born into the order to prevent Di Mambro from succeeding in his spiritual aim.

That’s the Order of the Solar Temple, and it should not be considered representative of all Jesus-based cults. But let’s work on the premise that OST is representative, and let’s all enjoy a safer existence.

The Years of Living Stupidly

Number 8 in a series

The photo shows creationists Walter Bradley and Ide Trotter at a workshop hosted by the Texas Education Agency, where they were assigned the task of reviewing high school biology texts for public schools.

I tend to devote this series to people being stupid about science, such as by using science and religion in the same sentence. That often comes about when people, caught up in religion, carry the contagion with them when they step across the line into fields of science—or into any other area requiring rational thought. Who does this a lot are the people at the Discovery Institute (DI), the premier organization in this country promoting Intelligent Design.

A rich resource on this kind of foolishness is the DI’s Center for Science and Culture (CSC), founded by creationist Stephen C. Meyer, among others. the thinking of DI fellows and the CSC are made public on an associated site called Evolution News. More recently, I found the following posted on the Discovery Institute site:

Neurosurgeon Michael Egnor: Why Machines Will Never Think

From remarks at the official launch of the Walter Bradley Center for Natural and Artificial Intelligence

ROBERT CROWTHER, II AUGUST 1, 2018

This is interesting on multiple levels, one of which relates to Dr. Michael Egnor, whom we have met before:

Michael Egnor is a prominent neurosurgeon and a professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Stony Brook University. He became inoculated against evolution (the science of biological evolution) after reading  Michael Denton‘s book Evolution: A Theory in Crisis. Egnor has aligned himself with the Discovery Institute Center for Science and Culture (CSC), one of the leading creationist organizations in this country and likely the absolute leader in support of the Intelligent Design version of creationism. An excerpt from one of his posts on the CSC’s Evolution News blog may be characteristic:

Scopes was put on trial for violating the Butler Act, which prohibited teaching human evolution to schoolchildren in Tennessee. What Scopes actually taught, if anything, is unclear, because Scopes was untruthful about what he did, and the trial was a legal ploy to spur a Supreme Court ruling. The truth was a secondary consideration at best to Scopes and to his team.

Hunter’s textbook Civic Biology was racist and taught eugenics. It was vile stuff. If a teacher taught from it today, he would not be prosecuted for violating the Butler Act. He would be prosecuted for federal civil rights violations.

Follow the link and read the post for complete details. Anyhow, Dr. Egnor now proposes to  boldly step outside his realm of expertise and into the quagmire that is Artificial Intelligence (AI). I took some time to read through his thinking on the matter, and you are invited to do likewise. What I found is that, while Dr. Egnor is likely correct in some of his conclusions, he is correct for the wrong reasons. An illustration from Dr. Egnor’s monograph:

What is the hallmark of human thought, and what distinguishes thoughts from material things? Franz Brentano (1838–1917), a German philosopher in the 19th century, answered this question decisively. All thoughts are about something, whereas no material object is inherently “about” anything. This property of aboutness is called intentionality, and intentionality is the hallmark of the mind. Every thought that I have shares the property of aboutness—I think about my vacation, or about politics, or about my family. But no material object is, in itself, “about” anything. A mountain or a rock or a pen lacks aboutness—they are just objects. Only a mind has intentionality, and intentionality is the hallmark of the mind.

Another word for intentionality is meaning. All thoughts inherently mean something. A truly meaningless thought is an oxymoron. The meaning may be trivial or confusing, but every thought entails meaning of some sort. Every thought is about something, and that something is the meaning of the thought.

That’s what I like about philosophers. First, they fall back on what other philosophers have said—with little or no attempt at confirmation, and they talk of things being true, apparently for the sole reason that they say they are true. How about, “Only a mind has intentionality, and intentionality is the hallmark of the mind?” Whether he realizes it or not, what Dr. Egnor has just done is to write a definition for the word mind. Please note the statement does not preclude a computer becoming a mind. What it says is that if a computer attains intentionality, then a computer can become a mind. Dr. Egnor never offers any reason a computer cannot become a mind. He says it, so it must be so.

Under other circumstances I would pass off Dr. Egnor’s musing as the product of religious corruption. I cannot do this, because it happens that Dr. Egnor, in his musings, is in the company of mental giants, one being renowned mathematical physicist Roger Penrose. It happens that Penrose is of the same mind as Dr. Egnor in this matter. Neither believes a computer can become a mind, and Penrose has written a book on the matter titled The Emperor’s New Mind. I have had a copy of the book since it came out in 1989, but I did not read through it. That’s because I quickly encountered conclusions I cannot sign off on. In the book, Penrose seems to invoke the argument from incredulity, much as Dr. Egnor does above. Martin Gardner wrote the forward, concluding:

Penrose’s achievements in mathematics and physics– and I have touched on only a small fraction– spring from a lifelong sense of wonder toward the mystery and beauty of being. His little finger tells him that the human mind is more than just a collection of tiny wires and switches. The Adam of his prologue and epilogue is partly a symbol of the dawn of consciousness in the slow evolution of sentient life. To me he is also Penrose– the child sitting in the third row, a distance back from the leaders of AI– who dares to suggest that the emperors of strong AI have no clothes. Many of Penrose’s opinions are infused with humour, but this one is no laughing matter.

Penrose, Roger. The Emperor’s New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (Oxford Landmark Science) (Kindle Locations 143-148). OUP Oxford. Kindle Edition.

Here is a sampling of Penrose’s own thinking, highlighted in my Kindle edition by earlier readers:

Most particularly, I argue that the phenomenon of consciousness cannot be accommodated within the framework of present-day physical theory.

Penrose, Roger. The Emperor’s New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (Oxford Landmark Science) (Kindle Locations 153-154). OUP Oxford. Kindle Edition.

My reasoning, as presented in this book, has two main strands to it. The first of these endeavours to show, by appealing to results of Gödel (and Turing) that mathematical thinking (and hence conscious thinking generally) is something that cannot be encapsulated within any purely computational model of thought. This is the part of my argument that my critics have most frequently taken issue with. The second strand of the reasoning is to demonstrate that there is an important gap in our physical picture of the world, at a level which ought to bridge the submicroscopic world of quantum physics to the macro-world of classical physics. My viewpoint demands that the missing physics falling within this gap, when found, will play an essential part in the physical understanding of the conscious mind. Moreover, there must be something outside purely computational action in this sought-for area of physics.

Penrose, Roger. The Emperor’s New Mind: Concerning Computers, Minds, and the Laws of Physics (Oxford Landmark Science) (Kindle Locations 164-170). OUP Oxford. Kindle Edition.

Penrose appears to set aside a special place for living forms, and he does not limit this thinking to the mind. I took four courses from  Wolfgang Rindler, and after I got my degree I came back to the campus to attend a 70th birthday party for him. Roger Penrose attended, as well, and he gave a talk in which he explained that living material needs to be explained in terms of  quantum physics. I  got that this was an explanation in terms of quantum  physics beyond the fact that quantum physics determines basic chemical properties of the elements, and I asked the question, “Are you resurrecting the concept of vitalism?” He assured me he was not, and I let it go at that. For the moment. The truth is, I consider Penrose’s invocation of quantum mechanics as vitalism dressed up in a lab coat.

Apparently anybody can be a philosopher, so I’m thinking about giving it a try. In future postings I will provide rational explanations for human thought, life, death, and the origin of the universe. Keep reading.

Darwin Day

A continuation

Back in February the Freethinkers Association of Central Texas (FACT) contributed an op-ed piece to the San Antonio Express-News in celebration of Charles Darwin’s birthday—Darwin Day. You can follow the link at the top of this page and read a reprint.

Subsequently there was a response from creationist Matthew Cserhati. I am reprinting his editorial here so you will have the opportunity to read it and also to allow me to link to it in something else I’m writing. Here it is:


Creationism is, in fact, science

By Matthew Cserhati, Correspondent
Published 12:00 am CDT, Sunday, July 22, 2018

Charles Darwin’s “The Origin of Species,” published about 100 years ago, expounded the theory of evolution. Creationists continue to insist it isn’t proven, final science.

Re: “As logic, science come under attack, push back with facts,” Another View by John Blanton, Feb. 11:

John Blanton, a member of the Freethinkers Association of Central Texas, paints what he calls religious people as opponents of reason and free thought. Specifically, he cites creationists on a wide spectrum challenging established science.

First of all, it is a well-known fact that science did not begin with Darwin, whose 209th birthday was being celebrated by FACT. Rather, science has its origin within the Christian church, with the command from God to “be fruitful and multiply; fill the earth and subdue it; have dominion over the fish of the sea, over the birds of the air, and over every living thing that moves on the earth” (Genesis 1:28). In order to subdue nature, one must understand it — hence the biblical injunction to pursue science.

Second of all, because it cannot be directly observed or verified, macro-level evolution cannot be considered to be a fact, however strong FACT would insist that it is. Explanations are offered only as to how species could have evolved. Lacking is the exact, precise demonstration that organisms did evolve. Thus evolution is only a theory.

Furthermore, it should never be a crime to question the authority of a well-nigh monolithic theory, which thousands of Ph.D.-level scientists such as I call into question based on scientific evidence. Blanton should remember that in 1925 the American Civil Liberties Union argued for equal representation of evolutionary theory during the Scopes trial, to which he referred. One voice openly questioning evolutionary theory should become millions, since half the population of the United States doesn’t accept evolution. An open public debate between creationism and evolution leads to more healthy science. Offering always only one side of the story leads to bad science and bad explanations.

Blanton cannot see the forest because of the trees. Blanton’s religion is materialistic naturalism, stemming from Jean-Jacques Rousseau’s idea that nature is everything that was, is and ever shall be, purposefully excluding God and the divine from the grand picture a priori. How can you be open-minded if you’re willing to consider only one line of explanation? Taken to the logical extreme, skeptics must doubt everything. Thus, truly, like Descartes they know next nothing. But God knows everything.

Creationism is scientific. Atheists acknowledge the fact that why the universe came into existence is a metaphysical question. Thus whether the universe came about either through natural or supernatural means is an open question. Therefore, since the origin of the universe has not been observed by a human eye, it is certainly possible that God created it. And, in such a supernaturally created world, it is possible to pursue origins science. Creationism doesn’t claim to be privy to the supernatural process of divine creation. Rather, creation science studies the handiwork of God’s creative acts. God created, therefore, let us examine the created world.

It is a well-known fact that thousands of so-called living fossils exist all over the world, resisting change over long periods of time. Taxonomists have discovered and studied millions of species, which all cluster into disjunct kinds that are spoken of in Genesis 1:21. Missing links are still missing. The scientific literature is chock-full of examples of genetic structures being “evolutionarily conserved,” an oxymoron if there ever was one. Genome reduction in organisms is so pervasive that researchers Yuri Wolf and Eugene Koonin in 2013 devised the biphasic model of genomic evolution whereby the genomes of organisms undergo initial rapid (miraculous) complexification, followed by gradual genome reduction, which is itself contrary to evolution.

Thus instead of trying to extinguish other opinions and points of view, so-called freethinkers should allow them to flourish.

Matthew Cserhati is a bioinformatics programmer living in San Antonio. He has a doctorate in biology and a bachelor’s degree in computer science. He has been active in the creation/evolution debate for 17 years and has presented on this subject numerous times.

Dying to Believe

Number 116 in a series

Feeling as though the world has started to go loopy? You’re not alone, and it has:

Nearly 90 Percent Of Americans Have Prayed For Healing

Prayer is a common but little-discussed feature of therapeutic care.

If you’ve ever prayed for healing for yourself or someone you know, you’re not alone. In fact, the majority of Americans have prayed for healing at least once in their lives, and this prevalence suggests the spiritual practice could have some major benefits, according to a new study.

About 79 percent of people have prayed for themselves and 87 percent have prayed for others, according to data from a randomized Gallup survey of 1,714 Americans. Among those who have prayed for themselves, 32 percent reported they do so often, and among those who have prayed for others, 51 percent do it often.

More than half of the survey respondents have asked for prayer for themselves or participated in a prayer group (54 percent and 53 percent, respectively), and 26 percent have even participated in a laying on of hands, or when a person places their hands on the body of someone who needs healing while praying for them.

A little background. I had hospital procedures on two occasions this year, and I kept getting this question in the entrance interview. “Do you have a religious preference.” I’m wondering if I answered yes, and something went wrong in the O.R., would they pray for me, or would they actually make an attempt at saving my life? The things is, I would never know.

Dying to Believe

Number 115 in a series

Unreasoned belief kills in many different ways. From The Washington Post:

Most girls in Somalia experience genital mutilation. The ritual just killed a 10-year-old.

In 2012, Somalia introduced a new constitution that was supposed to ban female genital mutilation. But a few years later, there had been little follow-up, and UNICEF still estimated that up to 98 percent of girls and women there had been cut.

This week, a Somali activist announced that a 10-year-old girl died in central Somalia in what she said was the direct result of an FGM procedure. Hawa Aden Mohamed, executive director of the Galkayo Education Center for Peace and Development, a Somali nongovernmental agency that advocates for women’s rights, said in a statement that “the circumciser is suspected to have cut an important vein in the course of the operation.” The girl died two days later.

Where is Jesus? Or Allah?

Bad Joke of the Week

One of a series

Agnes married and had 13 children.

When her husband died, she married again and had 7 children. Again her husband died.

So Agnes remarried and this time she had 5 more children.

Alas, Agnes finally died. Standing before her coffin  the preacher prayed for her. He thanked the Lord for this very loving woman and said, “Lord, they’re finally together.”

One mourner leaned over and quietly asked her friend, “Do you think he means her first, second, or third husband?”

The friend replied, “I think he means her legs.”

Dying to Believe

Number 114 in a series

Actually, you don’t have to die. Sometimes close is close enough:

North Florida Woman Crashes Into Home After Closing Eyes To Pray While Driving

Police didn’t indicate which prayer she said

A North Florida woman is saying her prayers after running her car into a home — fter saying her prayers.

The 28-year-old woman was driving in the tiny town of Mary Esther, located west of Fort Walton Beach in the Florida Panhandle. Deputies from the Okaloosa County Sheriff’s Office say the driver told them she was praying and had her eyes closed before the incident took place.

According to NWFDailyNews.com, authorities say she ran a stop sign, going through an intersection and into the yard of a home. The driver tried to back out, but her car got stuck in sand and dirt around the home.

Wait, wait! She didn’t have to  admit she had her eyes closed. She could have told police she blacked out for a moment. I mean, why else would somebody actually close their eyes while driving down a city street? Religion is one possible answer.

Dying to Believe

Number 113 in a series

Sometimes religious belief is downright embarrassing:

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — After battling for more than four years to keep a comatose daughter declared brain dead from being issued a California death certificate, Nailah Winkfield forcefully told mourners at her daughter’s funeral service Friday to stop letting doctors “pull the plug on your people.”

The San Francisco Bay Area congregation gave Winkfield a standing ovation for fighting to keep her daughter on life support and taking on the medical establishment in the brain death debate between science and religion.

Wait, there’s more:

Winkfield refused to accept the California doctors’ conclusions and took her daughter to New Jersey, a state that accommodates religions that don’t recognize brain death.

The girl was kept on life support and received nursing care until New Jersey doctors declared her dead last week, saying the 17-year-old died of excessive bleeding after an abdominal operation.

There is more that makes the story additionally interesting. The girl’s tonsillectomy was not routine:

She underwent surgery on December 9, 2013 at the Children’s Hospital & Research Center Oakland. After the procedure to remove her tonsils, adenoids and extra sinus tissue Jahi was alert and talking to doctors and even requested a Popsicle.

The girl’s family figures that God played a hand:

“My child was never dead, she was always alive and I thank God that the state of New Jersey realized that and that’s why she has a whole other death certificate with a whole other cause of death,” said Winkfield.

I’m guessing that God was taking the day off when Winkfield’s daughter died.

The Quintessence of Dumbshitia

Number 5 in a continuing thread

There’s a load of dumb shit going around, but you already knew that. This series of posts is about dumb shit. In fact, it’s about the quintessence of dumb shit, explicitly, the quintessence of Dumbshitia, whence comes all dumb shit. This piece of dumb shit comes from Israel:

Lawmaker Yinon Azoulay (Shas) said Wednesday that Reform Jews “are not Jews” and blamed the minor quakes in the GalileeWednesday morning on the lobby to build an egalitarian prayer space in the Western Wall.

Speaking at a Knesset debate on the contested mixed-gender prayer space in the Western Wall, Azoulay said: “Today we heard there was some kind of earthquake, maybe we should do some soul-searching that this earthquake was because someone is trying to touch that which is sacred to us? Hear our pain, they are not Jews.”

Let’s hear that again: “Today we heard there was some kind of earthquake, maybe we should do some soul-searching that this earthquake was because someone is trying to touch that which is sacred to us? Hear our pain, they are not Jews.” Not Jews? He’s speaking of reform Jews here. My interpretation: he’s blaming a small earthquake on Jews he considers not to be pure Jews.

Yes you heard it. Reform Jews, whatever they are doing, may have caused an earthquake. We might  wonder how that works. We may wonder in perpetuity.

Listen, dude, earthquakes are generally caused by the unsettled interior of this planet. Masses of plasticized material churn, shifting the overlaying crust. This puts the crust into mechanical stress, and from time to time the crustal plates rupture, with adjacent plates moving with respect to each other. The energy released represents built up strain energy, and movement is sudden and often  violent. People walking around and saying stuff does not cause earthquakes.

The headline for the above news item calls Mr. Azoulay “ultra-orthodox.” I’m taking from that he must be one of those who also believe the Earth is a little over 6000 years old. In that case, any statements regarding people talking and doing minor things (no a-bomb blasts) can cause an earthquake is the quintessence of Dumbshitia.

Dying to Believe

Number 112 in a series

Religion can be your friend, except when it is not. This isn’t Jonestown or even Heaven’s Gate. But I go with what comes around:

New Delhi (CNN) — Eleven members of a family in India’s capital Delhi were found dead in their house Sunday, 10 of them hanging from an iron grill on the ceiling, in an incident police say may be related to occult practices.

We can hope there is not a lot of that going around. We can hope in vain.

See also…

Heart of Dimness

Here is number 13

At the bottom of this page there is a section for comment, and there is a box for readers who want to leave a comment. I moderate these comments with the intent to approve all.  Ones I do not approve are those obviously spam or otherwise not related to  the topic of the original post.

As a result I receive comments expressing opposing views, and you might think I approve these out of an exalted sense of fairness, and that is partly true. Another reason I try to approve opposing comments is that they often reinforce the theme of this blog, ,that theme being that Skeptical Analysis can bring light to controversial issues. In so many cases it turns out that those who think they are giving weight to their wrong-headed notions are, in effect, doing the opposite. People pushing back against what I purport to be my voice of reason often reveal, in their comments, their lack of understanding, effectively reinforcing my original post. At other times the person posting a comment inadvertently reveals something else about where he/she is coming from.

Without much elaboration, what (eventually) follows is a comment to something I posted two years ago. The title of the original is “44 Reasons Why Evolution Is Just A Fairy Tale For Adults,” and it reflects the title of an item posted on a site called D.C. Clothesline, and here is what I had to say at the time:

This is amazing. I picked this link off my Facebook feed Friday and took a quick read. I am pasting it here:

The theory of evolution is false.  It is simply not true.  Actually, it is just a fairy tale for adults based on ancient pagan religious philosophy that hundreds of millions of people around the world choose to believe with blind faith.  When asked to produce evidence for the theory of evolution, most adults in the western world come up totally blank.  When pressed, most people will mumble something about how “most scientists believe it” and how that is good enough for them.  This kind of anti-intellectualism even runs rampant on our college campuses.  If you doubt this, just go to a college campus some time and start asking students why they believe in evolution.  Very few of them will actually be able to give you any real reasons why they believe it.  Most of them just have blind faith in the priest class in our society (“the scientists”).  But is what our priest class telling us actually true?  When Charles Darwin popularized the theory of evolution, he didn’t actually have any evidence that it was true.  And since then the missing evidence has still not materialized.  Most Americans would be absolutely shocked to learn that most of what is taught as “truth” about evolution is actually the product of the overactive imaginations of members of the scientific community.  They so badly want to believe that it is true that they will go to extraordinary lengths to defend their fairy tale.  They keep insisting that the theory of evolution has been “proven” and that it is beyond debate.  Meanwhile, most average people are intimidated into accepting the “truth” about evolution because they don’t want to appear to be “stupid” to everyone else.

In this day and age, it is imperative that we all learn to think for ourselves.  Don’t let me tell you what to think, and don’t let anyone else tell you what to think either.  Do your own research and come to your own conclusions.  The following are 44 reasons why evolution is just a fairy tale for adults…

My post from two years ago involved language that addressed each of the author’s 44 points. As of yesterday I count four responses to my original post, and here I submit the most recent.

It funny that very evidence your looking for from your statement is right there every-time you look in the mirror, breathe, eat or poop, your quoted “The entire theory of evolution is based on blind faith.” Yes! All of it! Luckily, creationism requires no act of blind faith… All it asks of you is to accept the existence of an omnipotent creator” if you or anything on this earth were not perfect first time nothing not bacteria would exist ……… Not once did the did you respond to anything with factual information or try to disprove it all you had was condescending childish retorts and sarcasm, your a fool and made yourself look foolish while trying to dismiss the article, that presented fact while showing error as opposed to your troll attack ….. smh in the end you’ll find out but then it will be too late

As I typically do, I copied and pasted the writer’s original text, making no attempt at correcting the language, which says something about the person posting the response. This is possibly reason number 12 I created and maintain the Skeptical Analysis blog.

Dying to Believe

Number 109 in a series

Jesus works in mysterious ways and in many disguises. Such as in this case:

Pastor killed by crocodile during water baptism

A water baptism ceremony held near a lake turned into a horrific tragedy when the pastor was reportedly grabbed by a crocodile Sunday.

Pastor Docho Eshete was baptizing at least 80 members of his Protestant congregation at Lake Abaya, in southern Ethiopia, an area known to have a huge crocodile population, when one of the creatures leaped out of the water and grabbed him.

“He baptized the first person and he passed on to another one,” a local resident told the BBC. “All of a sudden, a crocodile jumped out of the lake and grabbed the pastor.”

Jesus wanted him to come home, right now.

This is your President speaking.

Number 110 in a long series

And now a few words from the President of the United States:

Will be giving a Full Pardon to Dinesh D’Souza today. He was treated very unfairly by our government!

Well played, Mr. President, well played. But the question remains: how whacked out do you have to be to earn a presidential pardon these days? We may have, this day, established a new standard.

Wacko Right Wing Religious Fanatics Say The Darndest Things

Number 17 of a continuing series

I like to tell people that right-wing religious fanatics say the darndest things, and I don’t have far to go when looking for examples. Most recently (see the above link) I caught a video of right-wing religious fanatic Paul McGuire appearing on the Jim Bakker Show. He was there with co-author Troy Anderson, and much of the discussion centered on the book. Jesus will forgive me, but I had to purchase a copy. It is Trumpocalypse, and the Kindle edition is $14 ($13.99), delivered in seconds to my computer. Remember, I read these so that you won’t have to.

Anyhow, it’s worth a stroll through the 316 pages to see what passes for wisdom in some circles. I did that and picked out some bits for your enjoyment. First, some stats:

  • The word “conspiracy” appears 31 times.
  • Hillary Clinton is mentioned 51 times.
  • President Obama is mentioned 58 times.
  • There are 22 references to the Rothschild family.
  • “Apocalypse” appears 18 times, always capitalized.
  • There are 51 references to variations of the term “end-times.”
  • “Occult” appears 113 times.
  • “Deep state” appears 32 times.
  • Variations of “supernatural” appear in  52 places, sometimes in reference to the title of a work.
  • “Multi-dimensional” does not appear anywhere in any form in the book, despite author McGuire’s recent statement on the Jim BakkerShow that President Trump is currently engulfed in a battle with “advanced beings” who possess ‘supernatural multidimensional’ powers.”
  • And finally the book uses “Illuminati” 147 times, always capitalized.

It is worth noting that many of these references occur in passages McGuire quotes from others. Fact is, a significant bulk of text consists of quoted passages. Here is the context of some of these references, with key phrases highlighted.

“[The Economist] also happens to be owned by the Rothschild family and has a knack for touching on Illuminist pictures, hints, and outright disclosures guaranteed to make conspiracy theorists do a double-take,” explained S. Douglas Woodward, an Oracle and Microsoft executive and prophecy expert. “This year it has truly outdone itself. (By the way in 1988 the magazine predicted on its cover that in 2018 there would be a one-world government with a global currency and singular economic system. That is sure to pique any Bible prophecy buff’s interest.)”

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 3). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

Throughout the 2016 presidential race, the world became intensely fascinated with the prophecies involving Trump and former U.S. secretary of state Hillary Clinton and how a series of seemingly unrelated events—the populist uprising against the globalist elite and an explosion in occult phenomena—align with what prophecy scholars believe is a convergence in end-time markers.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (pp. 2-3). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

In recent decades, and largely during the Obama administration, many Americans watched with dismay as their nation—one the Pilgrims dedicated to God in the Mayflower Compact four centuries ago—underwent a radical and malevolent transformation.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 7). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

The best-known of the purported thirteen Illuminati families, according to the special publication Secret Societies: The Truth Revealed, are the Rothschilds and Rockefellers. In his book Our Occulted History: Do the Global Elite Conceal Ancient Aliens?, Jim Marrs wrote that the Rothschilds believe they are descended from Nimrod, the great-grandson of Noah. In this belief system, the “Anunnaki/Nefilim,” according to interpretations of ancient stone tablets from Sumer, are extraterrestrials who visited Earth in “fantastic flying machines” long ago and manipulated the “DNA of primitives on Earth”—creating “kings and dynasties” among “the new hybrids.” The term “Nefilim” is the biblical “Nephilim.” A growing number of Bible scholars say Nephilim were the offspring of women and fallen angels as described in Genesis 6:1–4, Numbers 13:30–33, and Jude 4–8. “The practice of dynastic kingship based on a royal lineage traceable to the gods has affected nations and governments up to the present day, as evidenced by the fact that the Rothschilds of today claim kinship with Nimrod,” Marrs wrote.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 100). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

[Referring to Donald Trump] The stunning victory of “the chaos candidate” not only confounded the predictions of pundits and pollsters but also created an eschatological mind-twister for students of the Apocalypse who are convinced the world is on the fast track to the end of human civilization.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 1). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

Since his thunderbolt election, Trump’s presidency has ignited end-time mania among Christians, Jews, Muslims, New Age adherents, and others curious as to how his presidency may fit into an increasingly mystifying prophetic puzzle, and whether the controversial and bombastic billionaire could paradoxically be a “John the Baptist” figure who will help usher in the “Messiah” and ultimately the Second Coming.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 2). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

These allegations of widespread occult influence in Washington, DC, came amid growing concerns about a “Deep State coup” and an explosion in occult phenomenon in America and worldwide.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 87). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

In what was perhaps the strangest presidential election in American history, the headlines shortly before Election Day 2016 hinted at the dark underbelly of a “diabolical scandal”—one that involves not just Bill and Hillary Clinton, but the “Deep State” and occult elite globally:

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 86). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

Finally, potential wars and nuclear conflicts are simmering around the world in Ukraine, Syria, Iraq, Iran, North Korea, the Pacific Rim, and Israel. A 2015 Brookings Institution poll found that 79 percent of evangelical Christians believe violence in the Middle East is a sign that the end times are “nearer.” The poll found that 81 percent of evangelicals believe Christ will return but are unsure when it will happen. A total of 73 percent say world events will turn against Israel as the world gets closer to the Rapture (the belief that Christians will be supernaturally removed from Earth to join Christ in eternity).

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 34). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

The “Illuminati” is a term that holds tremendous fascination with some right-wing religious fanatics, and the book is loaded with  references:

“We are having an incredible outpouring of occult things, of various alternative religions that are occult-based like Wicca, and even the Satanic Temple group that is getting so much press,” says Rev. William “Bill” Schnoebelen, a biblical authority on alternative religions and the occult and former Druidic high priest. “When I was into this stuff in the 1960s, it was all kind of in the closet. It’s now out in the open and it’s been mainstreamed… We have turned the reins of the culture over to Hollywood, and it’s been a disaster because the media, for the most part, are entirely owned by the Illuminati. All these different entertainers—Miley Cyrus, Madonna, and whatnot—are totally sold out to the devil’s agenda, and because of that, they have this enormous influence on the culture, especially with younger people, and we are losing this battle.”

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 89). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

For many years, an odd mix of investigative journalists, whistleblowers, prophecy experts, and others warned of the dangers of globalism—sounding the alarm that the wealthy elite and secret societies were planning a global coup to launch a world state, cashless society, and New Age–Illuminati-based religious system.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 95). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

The occult elite view themselves as “god-kings.” The term “Illuminati bloodlines” refers to the belief that certain families born thousands of years ago are genetically descended from entities who visited Earth from outer space or another dimension, but whom the Bible describes as fallen angels.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (pp. 99-100). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

Throughout history, members of secret societies have wielded enormous influence over the world’s most powerful empires. The Newsweek publication “Secret Societies: Infiltrating the Inner Circle” lists the names of the better-known secret societies: Druids, the Order of the Assassins, Knights Templar, Rosicrucians, and the Bavarian Illuminati. Semisecret societies like the Freemasons, Yale University’s Skull and Bones, Bohemian Grove, Bilderberg Group, Council on Foreign Relations, Trilateral Commission, and Club of Rome are often the topic of books, films, and media articles. Among these groups, the Bavarian Illuminati—a historical secret society founded May 1, 1776, by Adam Weishaupt, a professor at the University of Ingolstadt—has captured the world’s imagination and has been the focus of blockbuster books like Dan Brown’s Angels and Demons and The Da Vinci Code and films like Lara Croft: Tomb Raider. Celebrities often flash the Illuminati “pyramid signal” in music videos and during concerts.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 102). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

And that is as far as intend to take this. Don’t look for a complete review of the book. This should suffice. Readers can view the excerpts and come to their own conclusions. Mine is that there is another world out there. It’s a place where truth and fact tread lightly, being required often to pull back as unfounded thought rumbles through.

Dying to Believe

Number 107 in a series

The depth of human folly seems to have no limits, and five hundred years of enlightenment have been for naught. Unsubstantiated belief remains the deadly sinkhole it always was:

Infection alert after dying Ebola patients taken to Congo prayer meeting

Fortunately for this country, our highest elected officials have grown past false belief. Wait! Never mind.

Wacko Right Wing Religious Fanatics Say The Darndest Things

Number 16 of a continuing series

Yes, they really do. Take, for instance, right wing religious fanatic Paul McGuire, as brought to my attention by Dead State:

Last week, End Times author Paul McGuire appeared on the Jim Bakker Show and declared that President Trump is currently engulfed in “the greatest spiritual battle in the history of all mankind.” He expanded on his claim on his radio program this Thursday, this time clarifying that the battle is with “advanced beings” who possess “supernatural multidimensional” powers.

Allow me to restate for emphasis: “supernatural multidimensional” powers. I can get the supernatural part, because that’s what right wing religious fanatics are all about. But “multidimensional?” Whoa! That’s mathematics. That’s supposed to be my department.

But wait. Before this gets even weirder, it’s worth taking a look at the video from the Jim Bakker Show linked above. For those who don’t have time to wade through all 58 minutes, here are a few screen shots and some quotes:

First of all, a big part of this video is about selling McGuire’s book, Trumpocalypse. It is co-authored by Troy Anderson, who also appears in the video.

Of course, there is Jim Bakker, now out of prison:

James Orsen Bakker, born January 2, 1940) is an American televangelist, former Assemblies of God minister, convicted felon, and former host (with his former wife, Tammy Faye Bakker) of The PTL Club, an evangelical Christian television program. Bakker is also known for building Heritage USA in Fort Mill, South Carolina, a former Christian theme park which opened in 1978 and closed in 1989. He has written several books, including I Was Wrong and Time Has Come: How to Prepare Now for Epic Events Ahead.

A cover-up of hush money paid to Bakker’s secretary, Jessica Hahn, for alleged rape led to his resignation from the ministry. Subsequent revelations of accounting fraud brought about his conviction, imprisonment and divorce. Bakker later remarried and returned to televangelism, where he works on The Jim Bakker Show. He sells buckets of food to his audience on the show, in preparation for the end of days.

Also:

Crimes

The PTL Club’s fundraising activities between 1984 and 1987 were reported by The Charlotte Observer, eventually leading to criminal charges against Bakker. Bakker and his PTL associates sold $1,000 “lifetime memberships”, entitling buyers to an annual three-night stay at a luxury hotel at Heritage USA, during that period. According to the prosecution at Bakker’s fraud trial, tens of thousands of memberships were sold but only one 500-room hotel was ever finished. Bakker sold “exclusive partnerships” which exceeded capacity, raising more than twice the money needed to build the hotel. Much of the money paid Heritage USA’s operating expenses, and Bakker kept $3.4 million.

A $279,000 payoff for the silence of Jessica Hahn, who alleged that Bakker and pastor John Wesley Fletcher drugged and raped her, was paid with PTL’s funds through Bakker’s associate Roe Messner. Bakker, who made the PTL organization’s financial decisions, allegedly kept two sets of books to conceal accounting irregularities. Charlotte Observer reporters, led by Charles Shepard, investigated the PTL organization’s finances and published a series of articles.

On March 19, 1987, after the disclosure of a payoff to Hahn, Bakker resigned from PTL. Although he acknowledged that he met Hahn at a hotel room in Clearwater, Florida, he denied raping her. In late March 1987, Bakker was succeeded as PTL head by Jerry Falwell. Later that summer, as donations declined sharply in the wake of Bakker’s resignation and the end of the Bakkers’ PTL Club TV program, Falwell raised $20 million to keep PTL solvent and took a promised water slide ride at Heritage USA.

Fraud conviction and imprisonment

After a 16-month federal grand-jury probe, Bakker was indicted in 1988 on eight counts of mail fraud, 15 counts of wire fraud and one count of conspiracy. In 1989, after a five-week trial which began on August 28 in Charlotte, North Carolina, a jury found him guilty on all 24 counts. Judge Robert Daniel Potter sentenced Bakker to 45 years in federal prison and imposed a $500,000 fine. At the Federal Medical Center, Rochester in Rochester, Minnesota, he shared a cell with activist Lyndon LaRouche and skydiver Roger Nelson.

The United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit upheld Bakker’s conviction on the fraud and conspiracy charges, voided Bakker’s 45-year sentence and $500,000 fine, and ordered a new sentencing hearing in February 1991. The court ruled that Potter’s sentencing statement about Bakker, that “those of us who do have a religion are ridiculed as saps from [sic] money-grubbing preachers or priests”, was evidence that the judge had injected his religious beliefs into Bakker’s sentence.

A sentence-reduction hearing was held on November 16, 1992, and Bakker’s sentence was reduced to eight years. In August 1993, he was transferred to a minimum-security federal prison in Jesup, Georgia. Bakker was paroled in July 1994, after serving almost five years of his sentence. His son, Jay, spearheaded a letter-writing campaign to the parole board advocating leniency. Bakker was released from Federal Bureau of Prisons custody on December 1, 1994.

Tammy Faye has since died, and Jim Bakker now appears on television with his new wife, Lori Bakker.

Apocalypse and The End Times feature prominently in these religious programs.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X9SXamL_Nh4Banners at the bottom of the screen hawk the book.

Paul McGuire is not angry at his book. He’s just angry.

Some quotes

Troy Anderson: And now we’ve watched the media become so liberal and so biased and so all-out…attack on our president.

Jim Bakker: That’s what this book is all about. How can God use Trump? Trump is God’s wrecking ball.

Paul McGuire: God was looking for a man [pauses for emphasis] to take care of business.

Paul McGuire: He’s not a cream puff. He’s a warrior. So, who is going to defend our Christian liberties? Who’s going to keep the Constitution safe for freedom of religion? [Screen is filled with a photo of President Trump with the White House in the background and an on-screen banner that says “Donald J. Trump 45th President of the United States.”]

Paul McGuire: [Speaking of President Trump] We watch the man’s back, but not only that, but we watch his back as he drives every scoundrel, skunk, thief, deceiver, two-faced liar… [pause for emphasis, camera shifts] …with all the credentials, three-letter words… [An obvious reference to agencies such as the FBI, CIA, NSA]

Paul McGuire: He’s a mortal man. They want to kill him.

And that will about do it for quotes from the video. You need to watch it. It gets deeper than I have revealed.

It’s a curse. Somewhere in my youth I crossed the wrong god, and now I find myself having to atone. I get started writing one of these through a link that crops up on a news feed, and I innocently figure to write a short blurb and take my afternoon  nap. Then it happens. I get sucked down into the rabbit hole as I follow link after link, and I end up purchasing the book. It’s $13.99 from Amazon for the Kindle edition, but there is tax, despite what President Trump has promised you. But the book gets delivered in under 30 seconds, and you can’t pour yourself a diet soda during that time.

So here are a few quotes from the book. First from a chapter titled “Deep State Coup and Occult Explosion.” It’s a quote from somebody besides the authors of the book.

Well, I found some examples that I’ve seen firsthand in Washington—evidence, the influence of occultism, certainly witchcraft… You have a lot of witchcraft. You have a lot of hedonism. You have all the issues. When I think of Sodom and Gomorrah I often think of Washington, DC, in the same thought.

—LIEUTENANT COLONEL BOB MAGINNIS (RETIRED), SENIOR FELLOW FOR NATIONAL SECURITY AT THE FAMILY RESEARCH COUNCIL

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 86). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

The Family Research Council is another of those rabbit holes you might want to check out.

In what was perhaps the strangest presidential election in American history, the headlines shortly before Election Day 2016 hinted at the dark underbelly of a “diabolical scandal”—one that involves not just Bill and Hillary Clinton, but the “Deep State” and occult elite globally:

  • “Is Hillary Clinton the Antichrist or an Illuminati Witch?” (Jennifer LeClaire, Charisma News, August 11, 2016).
  • “Witchcraft on the Campaign Trail” (Stacy Schiff, New York Times, October 30, 2016).
  • “No, John Podesta Didn’t Drink Bodily Fluids at a Secret Satanist Dinner” (Abby Ohlheiser, Washington Post, November 4, 2016).
  • “The Devil Is a Woman: Ben Carson Ties Hillary Clinton to Lucifer as GOP Swaps Campaign for Witch Trial” (Gideon Resnick, the Daily Beast, July 20, 2016).

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (pp. 86-87). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

The articles also involved speculation by former presidential candidate Dr. Ben Carson at the Republican National Convention about a “Democratic-Satanic alliance.”

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 87). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

These allegations of widespread occult influence in Washington, DC, came amid growing concerns about a “Deep State coup” and an explosion in occult phenomenon in America and worldwide.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 87). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

The concept of the “Deep State” can be traced to President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s warning in his farewell address in 1961 about the growing power of the “military-industrial complex.”

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 88). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

We live in the time predicted by the ancient Hebrew prophets and prophesied by Jesus Christ and his apostles—an era of mass deception unparalleled in human history.

Today, the level of deceit, subterfuge and disinformation in politics, media, Hollywood, business, academia, and religion is truly mind-boggling. The “Mystery, Babylon” thought-control matrix is fully operational. In today’s occult-entangled and technology-addicted culture, it’s not hard to envision how the world and church could be duped by what is known in prophecy circles as “the Great Deception.”

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (pp. 112-113). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

At 120 Wall Street in New York City, the Arcane School at Lucis Trust—formerly Lucifer Publishing Company—is working on behalf of the “spiritual Hierarchy of the planet” to carry out the “Plan” to create the “New World Order.”

Lucis Trust defines the “Hierarchy” as the “inner spiritual governance of the world led by enlightened beings.” It’s also known as the “society of Illumined Minds.” Lucifer is known as the “Light Bringer, the Illumined One.”

As astounding as this may seem given its obvious occult connotations, it’s all detailed on the website of Lucis Trust, a nongovernmental organization that has “consultative status” with the United Nations Economic and Social Council and whose political lobby, World Goodwill, is accredited by the UN Department of Public Information.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 188). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

As many of you discovered in The Babylon Code with its extensive documentation, the Illuminati is as real today as it was in 1776 when its founder, University of Ingolstadt professor Adam Weishaupt, first called for a “New World Order through Revolution.” Today, the Illuminati network—operating through countless front groups and an interconnected web of multinational corporations, international banks, government agencies, think tanks, foundations, and secret societies—is believed to be in the final stages of implementing its Plan to launch the New World Order. Illuminati whistle-blowers and others claim this could start soon with an engineered financial collapse, outbreak of war, or a sophisticated global deception involving a “fake Antichrist” before the “fake Second Coming of Christ.” We’ll delve more into these claims later.

McGuire, Paul. Trumpocalypse: The End-Times President, a Battle Against the Globalist Elite, and the Countdown to Armageddon (Babylon Code) (p. 189). FaithWords. Kindle Edition.

Those are a few highlights I picked up while eating my cheese and crackers and vegetable soup for lunch today, and I will leave it at that. Look for more from this fabulous testament to early onset dementia. The book is solid gold.

People Unclear

This is number 42 of a long series

By now everybody knows I’m never going to run out of these. No matter how obvious the matter is, no matter how well it may have been explained, there will always be some who are still unclear.

Full disclosure: years ago I signed up for the newsletter from Dallas Pastor Robert Jeffress. He heads up the massive First Baptist Church of Dallas in that city’s business district. If I told you that Pastor Jeffress is a boundless source of entertainment, that would be an understatement. Here’s the latest.

Pastor Jeffress is a great admirer of President Donald Trump, one of the president’s closest confidants after Stormy Daniels. So it came to pass that when President Trump wanted to celebrate the opening of our new embassy in Jerusalem last week, Pastor Jeffress went to deliver the benediction, for want of a better description. Given the pastor’s prior comments on Jews and other religious affiliations, that seemed odd to a number of people, and there were even strong objections. One of those who commented was ex Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney. It’s all strung out in a video linked by the email I received. Take a look. I obtained these images from the video.

Anyhow, according to the video, the former governor and current candidate for the Senate, had this to say:

Robert Jeffress says “you can’t be saved by being a Jew,” and “Mormonism is a heresy from the pit of hell.” He’s said the same thing about Islam. Such a religious bigot should not be giving the prayer that opens the United States Embassy in Jerusalem.

What makes this most interesting is that Mitt Romney is a Mormon. To further elaborate, the subject line of the email I received reads, “Breaking News: Mitt Romney Attacks Dr. Robert Jeffress …” Here is the body of the email:

Dr. Robert Jeffress’ dedication prayer at the opening of the United States Embassy in Jerusalem last week sparked a national controversy over the fact that Jesus Christ is the only way to salvation.
U.S. Senate candidate Mitt Romney attacked Dr. Jeffress shortly before he delivered the opening dedication prayer by calling him a bigot for proclaiming the exclusivity of salvation through Jesus Christ.

Pardon me if I need to  pause at this point. I do not know whether to laugh or to cry. This is just too bizarre. Two grown men, supposedly mature enough to be allowed to handle sharp objects and to operate heavy machinery, are sparing over different versions of a well-debunked myth. Particularly hilarious are the references to “Jesus Christ.” Both men claim to be adherents to Jesus, and they cannot, at least Pastor Jeffress cannot, even agree on the matter of Jesus Christ.

Full disclosure: I have previously voted for political  candidates who claimed to be fans of Jesus Christ. May Jesus have mercy on my soul.

Wacko Right Wing Religious Fanatics Say The Darndest Things

Number 15 of a continuing series

And do they ever. Start by looking at the image above. That’s from right wing religious fanatic Robert Jeffress. I lived some time in Dallas, Texas, so I gained some familiarity with the “pastor of the 13,000-member First Baptist Church, which is in the heart of the city’s business district. More recently I subscribed to his newsletter, and I receive periodic mailings, such as the above. It’s what Pastor Jeffress has to say in this message that is most interesting. To quote:

What a fool!
I must admit, I’ve caught myself thinking this a time or two … It seems like we’ve seen more than our fair share of “fools” lately.
Just turn on the news or click on your favorite website and you’ll find —

  • Horrible mistakes
  • Immoral decisions
  • Glaring lapses in judgment

One act of foolishness can cripple the mightiest of men and destroy an entire life.
That’s why it’s so important that we learn the way of wisdom.

I changed the message text a bit to highlight the bullet points. It’s interesting to view them in the light of acknowledged fact. I’m bearing down on “Glaring lapses in judgment.” From his Wikipedia entry:

Jeffress believes that Jews, Muslims, Mormons, Catholics and Hindus have rejected Christ and will go to hell.

In a sermon in August 2010, Jeffress said that Prophet Muhammad and Islam promoted pedophilia referring to Aisha’s age at marriage. In a part of an interview published in August 2010 by his First Baptist Dallas Youtube Channel, Robert Jeffress also said that the religion is “evil”, “violent”, and “false” while he was responding to a question about equating “the Muslim Jihad to the Christian Crusades.”

In the same interview, Jeffress also implied that the “average” numbers of casualties on September 11, 2001, had been larger than in the “overblown” atrocities committed in the name of Jesus against “unbelievers” as Jeffress was referring to The Bible and violence.

Also from Wikipedia:

In the summer of 2017, addressing the issue of DACA and children born to illegal immigrants, Jeffress said the “president is one of the most compassionate people I have ever been around, and he was sincerely torn between his sincere compassion for the DACA recipients and the oath of office he took on January 20th to execute all the laws of the land.”

Speaking of President Donald Trump, Pastor Jeffress has furthered the appearance that he lacks judgment in his more-than-cordial relationship with one of the least moral holders of the office. Wikipedia again:

For the 2016 US Presidential election, Jeffress endorsed and appeared at rallies for the Republican candidate, Donald Trump although he initially endorsed Ben Carson. Jeffress also declared that Christians who would not vote for or support Trump as the Republican nominee were “fools” and “motivated by pride rather than principle.”

And finally:

Jeffress appeared on Fox News to proclaim, “Even if [the allegation of President Donald Trump having an affair with a former adult film star Stephanie Clifford (a.k.a. Stormy Daniels) is] proven to be true, it doesn’t matter.”

In the aftermath of the Las Vegas massacre in October 2017, Jeffress appeared on the Fox Business network and said, “Evil is real, but evil is also temporary.”

After Hurricane Harvey devastated the greater Houston area, Jeffress was recorded in the Oval Office praying, “We thank you that the president had the wisdom to call our nation right now to a Day of Prayer. This is what we need.”

That should about do it with “Glaring lapses in judgment.” And may Jesus have mercy on our souls.