Dying to Believe

Some more of the same

altmed-homeopathiccuregullibility

No way did I ever think I would outlive this guy. I followed his career with the rise of the Apple computer into one of the financial giants of our time. Steve Jobs had everything going for him, wealth, youth, and an intellect that towered over most others. Apparently that magnificent intellect was thrown away, as has happened with so many lesser ones:

In October 2003, Jobs was diagnosed with cancer. In mid-2004, he announced to his employees that he had a cancerous tumor in his pancreas. The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is usually very poor; Jobs stated that he had a rare, much less aggressive type, known as islet cell neuroendocrine tumor.

Despite his diagnosis, Jobs resisted his doctors’ recommendations for medical intervention for nine months, instead relying on a pseudo-medicine diet to try natural healing to thwart the disease. According to Harvard researcher Ramzi Amri, his choice of alternative treatment “led to an unnecessarily early death.” Cancer researcher and alternative medicine critic David Gorski disagreed with Amri’s assessment, saying, “My best guess was that Jobs probably only modestly decreased his chances of survival, if that.” Barrie R. Cassileth, the chief of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center‘s integrative medicine department, said, “Jobs’s faith in alternative medicine likely cost him his life…. He had the only kind of pancreatic cancer that is treatable and curable…. He essentially committed suicide.” According to Jobs’s biographer, Walter Isaacson, “for nine months he refused to undergo surgery for his pancreatic cancer – a decision he later regretted as his health declined.” “Instead, he tried a vegan diet, acupuncture, herbal remedies, and other treatments he found online, and even consulted a psychic. He was also influenced by a doctor who ran a clinic that advised juice fasts, bowel cleansings and other unproven approaches, before finally having surgery in July 2004.” He eventually underwent a pancreaticoduodenectomy (or “Whipple procedure”) in July 2004, that appeared to remove the tumor successfully. Jobs did not receive chemotherapy or radiation therapy.

Steve Jobs died in 2011.

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2 thoughts on “Dying to Believe

  1. There was speculation that he may have breathed in some of the rare metals he was soldering with in the early days, and that triggered the chain of events that led to cancer. Interesting theory.

    Really bad guy. The worst possible role model. Good riddance.

  2. Pingback: Dying to Believe | Skeptical Analysis

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